oldrags: 
Dress by Mon Vignon, ca 1869-70 France 
Many of you have probably seen this dress but I wanted to add an interesting little fact about it that you may not know. 
What color would you say the fabric is?  Purple?  Actually, it’s mauve as it was meant to look.  The first synthetic dye, mauveine, was discovered by accident in 1856 when an 18-year-old student was trying to find a cure for malaria.  Being the first of its kind, there were problems with the dye that caused the color to fade relatively quickly.  This is why our modern idea of the color mauve is sort of a faded grayish-purple.  Examples that have faded little do exist, though, as seen here.

oldrags

Dress by Mon Vignon, ca 1869-70 France 

Many of you have probably seen this dress but I wanted to add an interesting little fact about it that you may not know. 

What color would you say the fabric is?  Purple?  Actually, it’s mauve as it was meant to look.  The first synthetic dye, mauveine, was discovered by accident in 1856 when an 18-year-old student was trying to find a cure for malaria.  Being the first of its kind, there were problems with the dye that caused the color to fade relatively quickly.  This is why our modern idea of the color mauve is sort of a faded grayish-purple.  Examples that have faded little do exist, though, as seen here.

dazzlingagony: The Initiation Well photography by isolano 
In the town of Sintra, the Quinta da Regaleira, an extremely beautiful architectural complex, includes an early twentieth century palace and a garden. Specialists consider that the estate reveals and symbolises Masonic rituals, although no-one knows whether the original owner of the estate, António Carvalho Monteiro, actually practised Masonic rituals on the site, or simply desired to perpetuate the imaginary universe of this secret cult.
The garden includes labyrinthine galleries and subterranean grottoes, which can be accessed from this dry well, 60 metres deep, 9 stairwells each with 15 steps.

dazzlingagony: The Initiation Well photography by isolano 

In the town of Sintra, the Quinta da Regaleira, an extremely beautiful architectural complex, includes an early twentieth century palace and a garden. Specialists consider that the estate reveals and symbolises Masonic rituals, although no-one knows whether the original owner of the estate, António Carvalho Monteiro, actually practised Masonic rituals on the site, or simply desired to perpetuate the imaginary universe of this secret cult.

The garden includes labyrinthine galleries and subterranean grottoes, which can be accessed from this dry well, 60 metres deep, 9 stairwells each with 15 steps.

(via dazzlingagony-deactivated201111)

graveyarddirt: Bolete Lesson #2, by Ms. Graveyard Dirt

Whoa, whoa, whoa! Where the fuck are you going? Class ain’t done; sit the fuck back down. Your ass is dismissed when I say it’s dis-f’ing-missed (unless you’re looking for a hardcore dose of corporeal punishment all Victorian schoolhouse-style).
One more thing: remember how I said The most prolific of the bunch [boletes] can usually be found beneath pines. A whole host of boletes love long-needled conifers, but you got to get those f’ers young because they tend to be the ones that get slimy quickly. in Bolete Lesson #1? They are a family called Suillus in the larger order Boletales.
They’re still boletes, they’re still edible but their distinguishing feature - the weirdly sticky-but-not-sticky and slimy-but-not-slimy textured cap - should be peeled off during the cleaning process. While not poisonous the cap does contain a mild purgative that can affect people with super sensitive stomachs. Don’t let that put you off harvesting them - especially Suillus luteus (aka slippery Jack & sticky bun); picture above - they’re beautifully fruity with a teasing hint of earthy sweetness.
READ MORE @ GRAVEYARD DIRT »

graveyarddirtBolete Lesson #2, by Ms. Graveyard Dirt

Whoa, whoa, whoa! Where the fuck are you going? Class ain’t done; sit the fuck back down. Your ass is dismissed when I say it’s dis-f’ing-missed (unless you’re looking for a hardcore dose of corporeal punishment all Victorian schoolhouse-style).

One more thing: remember how I said The most prolific of the bunch [boletes] can usually be found beneath pines. A whole host of boletes love long-needled conifers, but you got to get those f’ers young because they tend to be the ones that get slimy quickly. in Bolete Lesson #1? They are a family called Suillus in the larger order Boletales.

They’re still boletes, they’re still edible but their distinguishing feature - the weirdly sticky-but-not-sticky and slimy-but-not-slimy textured cap - should be peeled off during the cleaning process. While not poisonous the cap does contain a mild purgative that can affect people with super sensitive stomachs. Don’t let that put you off harvesting them - especially Suillus luteus (aka slippery Jack & sticky bun); picture above - they’re beautifully fruity with a teasing hint of earthy sweetness.

READ MORE @ GRAVEYARD DIRT »

(via mycology)

life:

Dear Hurricane Irene,
You are ruining our weekend.
Sincerely,
LIFE staff & all of NYC/East Coast/Etc.
(more: Hurricanes Seen From Space)

life:

Dear Hurricane Irene,

You are ruining our weekend.

Sincerely,

LIFE staff & all of NYC/East Coast/Etc.

(more: Hurricanes Seen From Space)

(Source: 2headedsnake, via yuksekokce)

life: 
Acclaimed author Mark Adams not only visited the ancient ruins of the  cloud-ringed city of Machu Picchu in Peru — he attempted to recreate  the trek of the man commonly credited with rediscovering it, the Indiana  Jones-style Yale University professor Hiram Bingham, who came upon the  city on July 24, 1911. He sat down with LIFE.com recently to guest edit a gallery about Machu Picchu’s greatest mysteries … see more — The Lost City of Machu Picchu

life

Acclaimed author Mark Adams not only visited the ancient ruins of the cloud-ringed city of Machu Picchu in Peru — he attempted to recreate the trek of the man commonly credited with rediscovering it, the Indiana Jones-style Yale University professor Hiram Bingham, who came upon the city on July 24, 1911. He sat down with LIFE.com recently to guest edit a gallery about Machu Picchu’s greatest mysteries … see moreThe Lost City of Machu Picchu

waterlilyjewels: Tvindefossen in Tvinno, Norway by dmcantrell

waterlilyjewels: Tvindefossen in Tvinno, Norway by dmcantrell

zveneczi: Symbol No. 1 of Paris

zveneczi: Symbol No. 1 of Paris

waterlilyjewels: On the lakefront in Vitznau on Lake Lucerne, Switzerland by Curnen
Petit is packed and ready :)

waterlilyjewelsOn the lakefront in Vitznau on Lake Lucerne, Switzerland by Curnen

Petit is packed and ready :)

waterlilyjewels: A large red jellyfish swims in the waters off of South Africa by jtresfon

waterlilyjewels: A large red jellyfish swims in the waters off of South Africa by jtresfon

waterlilyjewels:

A lone starfish in the waters of Cancun, Mexico

waterlilyjewels:

A lone starfish in the waters of Cancun, Mexico

waterlilyjewels: Bellagio on Lake Como, Italy by John in Scotland

waterlilyjewelsBellagio on Lake Como, Italy by John in Scotland

waterlilyjewels: Boracay sunset in the Philippines via Best Places to Go Scuba Diving – Nomadic Matt’s Travel Site
oldrags: 1920’s Mules, France, MFA Boston, MA, USA

oldrags: 1920’s Mules, France, MFA Boston, MA, USA