coffee-tea-and-sympathy

Palácio da Pena, or “Castelo da Pena” as it is more commonly known, is the most complete and notable example of Portuguese architecture in the Romantic period.

It stands on one of the rocky peaks of the Serra de Sintra, and blends in a surprisingly fortunate manner with its natural background of greenery and crags, testifying to the aesthetic potentialities of the project. 

The Palace dates back to 1839, when the King Consort Dom Fernando II of Saxe Coburg-Gotha (1816-1885) bought the ruins of the Hieronymite Monastery of Nossa Senhora da Pena and started to adapt it for use as a residence, according to his Romantic taste.

fromeuropewithlove: Belem Tower, Lisbon, Portugal

fromeuropewithlove: Belem Tower, Lisbon, Portugal

(Source: Flickr / riisli)

dazzlingagony: The Initiation Well photography by isolano 
In the town of Sintra, the Quinta da Regaleira, an extremely beautiful architectural complex, includes an early twentieth century palace and a garden. Specialists consider that the estate reveals and symbolises Masonic rituals, although no-one knows whether the original owner of the estate, António Carvalho Monteiro, actually practised Masonic rituals on the site, or simply desired to perpetuate the imaginary universe of this secret cult.
The garden includes labyrinthine galleries and subterranean grottoes, which can be accessed from this dry well, 60 metres deep, 9 stairwells each with 15 steps.

dazzlingagony: The Initiation Well photography by isolano 

In the town of Sintra, the Quinta da Regaleira, an extremely beautiful architectural complex, includes an early twentieth century palace and a garden. Specialists consider that the estate reveals and symbolises Masonic rituals, although no-one knows whether the original owner of the estate, António Carvalho Monteiro, actually practised Masonic rituals on the site, or simply desired to perpetuate the imaginary universe of this secret cult.

The garden includes labyrinthine galleries and subterranean grottoes, which can be accessed from this dry well, 60 metres deep, 9 stairwells each with 15 steps.

(via dazzlingagony-deactivated201111)

allthingseurope: Faro, Portugal by Sandra R

allthingseurope: Faro, Portugal by Sandra R