poboh: 1888 Frederick Childe Hassam (American Impressionist, 1859-1935) ~ Mrs. Hassam at Villiers le Bel

poboh: 1888 Frederick Childe Hassam (American Impressionist, 1859-1935) ~ Mrs. Hassam at Villiers le Bel

zeroing: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ Sunflowers

zeroing: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ Sunflowers

(via madamescherzo)

artmastered: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ View of Arles with Irises in the Foreground

artmastered: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ View of Arles with Irises in the Foreground

(via in-tacto)

fleurdulys: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ Pink Peach Tree

fleurdulys: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ Pink Peach Tree

(via madamescherzo)

geisterseher: 1888 Richard André (French, 1834-1907) ~ The Three Bears; McLoughlin Bros

geisterseher: 1888 Richard André (French, 1834-1907) ~ The Three Bears; McLoughlin Bros

(via myaloysius-deactivated20140503)

stilllifequickheart: 1888 Julian Alden Weir (American Impressionist, 1859-1919) ~ Fruit

stilllifequickheart: 1888 Julian Alden Weir (American Impressionist, 1859-1919) ~ Fruit

paperimages: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ Oleanders

paperimages: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ Oleanders

vriad-lee: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ Wheat Fields Near Arles

vriad-lee: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ Wheat Fields Near Arles

(via everainsplanet)

stilllifequickheart: 1888-94 Henry George [H.G.] Moon (English, 1857-1905) ~ Odontoglossum Crispum

stilllifequickheart: 1888-94 Henry George [H.G.] Moon (English, 1857-1905) ~ Odontoglossum Crispum

fleurdulys: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ Avenue in the Park

fleurdulys: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ Avenue in the Park

(via sadyoungliterarygirls)

saturnsdaughter: 1888 John William Waterhouse (British, 1849-1917) ~ The Lady of Shallot, from Lord Alfred Tennyson’s 1832 ‘The Lady of Shallot’, Part IV

… And down the river’s dim expanse
Like some bold seer in a trance,Seeing all his own mischance—With glassy countenanceDid she look to Camelot.And at the closing of the dayShe loosed the chain, and down she lay;The broad stream bore her far away,The Lady of Shalott.(…)

saturnsdaughter: 1888 John William Waterhouse (British, 1849-1917) ~ The Lady of Shallot, from Lord Alfred Tennyson’s 1832 ‘The Lady of Shallot’, Part IV

… And down the river’s dim expanse

Like some bold seer in a trance,
Seeing all his own mischance—
With glassy countenance
Did she look to Camelot.
And at the closing of the day
She loosed the chain, and down she lay;
The broad stream bore her far away,
The Lady of Shalott.(…)


(via castawaystar)

brocreate: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ The Cafe Terrace on the Place du Forum
After finishing the piece, he wrote to his sister:
“It is already a few days since I started writing this letter, and now I will continue it.
In point of fact I was interrupted these days by my toiling on a new picture representing the outside of a café at night. On the terrace there are the tiny figures of drinkers. An immense yellow lantern illuminates the terrace, the façade and the sidewalk, and even casts its light on the pavement of the streets, which takes a pinkish violet tone.
The gables of the houses in the street stretching away under a blue sky spangled with stars are dark blue or violet with a green tree. Here you have a night picture without black in it, done with nothing but beautiful blue and violet and green, and lemon-yellow. It amuses me enormously to paint the night right on the spot. They used to draw and paint the picture in the daytime after the sketch. But I find satisfaction in painting the thing immediately.
Of course it’s true that in the dark I may mistake a blue for a green, a blue-lilac for a pink-lilac, for you cannot distinguish the quality of a hue very well. But it is the only way to get rid of the conventional night scenes with their poor sallow whitish light, when even a simple candle gives us the richest yellows and orange tints.”

brocreate: 1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ The Cafe Terrace on the Place du Forum

After finishing the piece, he wrote to his sister:

“It is already a few days since I started writing this letter, and now I will continue it.

In point of fact I was interrupted these days by my toiling on a new picture representing the outside of a café at night. On the terrace there are the tiny figures of drinkers. An immense yellow lantern illuminates the terrace, the façade and the sidewalk, and even casts its light on the pavement of the streets, which takes a pinkish violet tone.

The gables of the houses in the street stretching away under a blue sky spangled with stars are dark blue or violet with a green tree. Here you have a night picture without black in it, done with nothing but beautiful blue and violet and green, and lemon-yellow. It amuses me enormously to paint the night right on the spot. They used to draw and paint the picture in the daytime after the sketch. But I find satisfaction in painting the thing immediately.

Of course it’s true that in the dark I may mistake a blue for a green, a blue-lilac for a pink-lilac, for you cannot distinguish the quality of a hue very well. But it is the only way to get rid of the conventional night scenes with their poor sallow whitish light, when even a simple candle gives us the richest yellows and orange tints.”

(via jaimelannister)

composition-improvisation: ca 1888 Childe Hassam (American Impressionist, 1859-1935) ~ Geraniums

composition-improvisation: ca 1888 Childe Hassam (American Impressionist, 1859-1935) ~ Geraniums

(Source: impartart)

1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ Seascape Near Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer

1888 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-90) ~ Seascape Near Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer

(Source: peira, via madamescherzo)

classic-art: 1888 William Bouguereau (French Academic, 1845-1905) ~ The First Mourning

classic-art: 1888 William Bouguereau (French Academic, 1845-1905)The First Mourning

(via mcfandrew)